LASDHQ

Graphic of Sheriff Villanueva next to Hall Of Justice
SB 1421 Compliance 1024 249 SIB Staff

SB 1421 Compliance

SB 1421 Compliance

Under my leadership, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department is more transparent than ever before. With greater transparency comes greater accountability. One area this has been demonstrated is our cooperation with the Citizen Oversight Commission (COC) and the Office of Inspector General (OIG).

In anticipation of the colossal amount of requests for records prior to the bills enactment on January 1, 2019, we requested funding from the Board of Supervisors for additional personnel and computer software to address the added workload created by the SB 1421 mandate. To date, our requests have been ignored.

In November 2019, I reorganized the Audit and Accountability Bureau (AAB), on a temporary basis, in order to dedicate resources to the SB 1421 project. We also implemented a tracking system specifically for COC and OIG requests, to ensure a timely response.

In the calendar year of 2019, the Department responded to 43 known requests from the COC and OIG. From January 1, 2020 to May 1, 2020, the Department has responded to 59 of the 62 requests made by the COC and OIG.

Since November 2019, AAB has received a total of 2,848 requests for review. As of June 11, 2020, AAB has responded to 75% of the requests.

The true goals and values of government can be found in how the budget is allocated. If something is deemed important, the Board of Supervisors has the responsibility and obligation to fully fund it. Due to our limited staffing and our lack of SB 1421 specified funding, the fulfillment of SB 1421 compliance has been difficult. We will continue to do the best we can with what we have in place.

Please visit LASD.org to explore my transparency promise.

Graphic of Sheriff Villanueva next to Hall Of Justice
CURFEW ORDER AND PUBLIC TRUST June 3, 2020 1024 249 SIB Staff

CURFEW ORDER AND PUBLIC TRUST June 3, 2020

CURFEW ORDER AND PUBLIC TRUSTJune 3, 2020

The residents of Los Angeles County are unified in support of the family of George Floyd, and against criminal actions by law enforcement.  We stand together in this endeavor.  Unfortunately, small groups of individuals seeking to incite violence and looting have disrupted some of the peaceful protests with criminal behavior.  These actions forced the need for a curfew throughout Los Angeles County in order to protect life, protect property, and restore order.

Over the past 24 hours, protesters have not allowed criminal behavior to overshadow their message, and law enforcement has been able to isolate and apprehend many individuals involved in criminal behavior.

Consistent with the First Amendment Rights of all citizens, the Sheriff’s Department will be enforcing the curfew order from 10:00 PM to 5:00 AM. 

While law-enforcement has fully mobilized to protect the community, trust is a two-way street.  In doing so, I am signaling my trust in the public, so we can all work together in partnership during these troubling times.

Graphic of Sheriff Villanueva next to Hall Of Justice
Sheriff addresses Social Media videos 1024 249 SIB Staff

Sheriff addresses Social Media videos

SOCIAL MEDIA VIDEOSJune 3, 2020

I am aware of two videos circulating on social media involving my deputies. As with all use of force incidents, these cases will be thoroughly investigated, and we will also examine the tactics, policies & procedures.

As I have stated before, this is another example of why we so desperately need the Board of Supervisors to fully fund the LASD body-worn camera project.  The public deserves full transparency.

Graphic of Sheriff Villanueva next to Hall Of Justice
Sheriff Alex Villanueva’s Message to the Troops 1024 249 SIB Staff

Sheriff Alex Villanueva’s Message to the Troops

Sheriff Alex Villanueva’s Message to the Troops

This is Sheriff Villanueva. We have a responsibility to ensure the safety of all residents and businesses in Los Angeles County. As incidents of looting are reported anywhere in our county, we will respond and assist local police departments. We will also take proactive action and deploy anywhere in the county where violence is taking afoot, protect lawfully assembled protesters, and use your discretion in enforcing the law where needed.

Be safe out there, Car-1 signing off.

Sheriff Composing a message to the troops on a computer
Sheriff composing a message to the troops from the ops center.
LASD Sheriff's Department Logo
Los Angeles County Imposes Third Night of Curfew 600 128 SIB Staff

Los Angeles County Imposes Third Night of Curfew

Please visit this link for new curfew – Curfew Order – June 3, 2020

Los Angeles County Imposes Third Night of Curfew

Los Angeles County will be under a countywide curfew that runs from 6 p.m. today, June 2, 2020, through 6 a.m. on Wednesday, June 3, 2020.

The curfew does not apply to individuals voting in Special Elections occurring today in the City of Commerce and in El Rancho Unified School District in Pico Rivera. In both elections, all voters were mailed ballots and the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk has one mobile vote center in each jurisdiction that has been open daily since Saturday and will be open today until 8 p.m. Poll workers are also exempt from the order.

This is the third night of a countywide curfew ordered to protect public safety. 

The County curfew applies to every municipality in Los Angeles County, but cities can implement stricter curfews based on their local needs. Please check with your local city to determine if they have implemented stricter curfews.

In addition to voters and poll workers being exempt, the countywide curfew does not apply to the following: peace officers; firefighters; National Guard or other military personnel deployed to the area; emergency medical services personnel; individuals traveling to and from work; individuals working on a public work of improvement construction project; credentialed media representatives involved in news gathering; people experiencing homelessness and without access to a viable shelter; and individuals seeking medical treatment.

The following cities have already implemented stricter curfews:

Visit lacounty.gov/emergency for the most up-to-date information.

https://lacounty.gov/emergency/
LASD Sheriff's Department Logo
Sheriff extends County-wide curfew for LA County 600 128 SIB Staff

Sheriff extends County-wide curfew for LA County

Please visit this link for new curfew – Curfew Order – June 3, 2020

Sheriff Villanueva Extends County-Wide Curfew for Los Angeles County

At the direction of Sheriff Alex Villanueva, the county-wide curfew was renewed.  Effective at 6:00 P.M. on Monday, June 1, 2020, through 6:00 A.M. on Tuesday, June 2, 2020, all incorporated and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County shall adhere to staying off public streets, avenues, boulevards, places, walkways, alleys, parks or any public areas or unimproved private realty within Los Angeles County, between the hours of 6:00 P.M. and 6:00 A.M. the following day.  The county may renew, amend or extend this order, in accordance with California Government Code section 8634 and County Code section 2.68.150.

This order does not apply to peace officers, fire fighters, and National Guard or other military personnel deployed to the area, individuals traveling to and from work, people experiencing homelessness and without access to a viable shelter, and individuals seeking medical treatment.  On Monday, June 1, 2020, the order was amended to include credentialed members of the media involved in media gathering.

In the event the county curfew is more stringent than a resident’s local curfew order, the county curfew will supersede it.  In other words, if a resident’s local curfew order is 8:00 P.M., the 6:00 P.M. county curfew supersedes it; if the local order is 4:00 P.M., the local order still stands. 

Any violation of the order is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine not to exceed $1,000 or by imprisonment for a period not to exceed six months, or both, as provided by LACC section 2.68.320 or any applicable state or municipal law.

Because of the dangers which often occur under cover of darkness and the difficulty to preserve public safety during these hours, a curfew was ordered, as allowed by Government Code Section 8634, and signed by Chair Supervisor Kathryn Barger.

The order was transmitted not only through media and social media platforms, but through a wireless alert system called Wireless Emergency Alerts, also known as WEA.  In the event of a public safety emergency, authorized government authorities can broadcast pertinent information directly to the public through their wireless carriers. 

For more information about WEA, visit the Federal Communications Commission website at:  https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/wireless-emergency-alerts-wea

Executive Order of the Chair of The County of Los Angels Board of Supervisors – PDF

LASD Sheriff's Department Logo
Sheriff orders County-wide Curfew for LA County 600 128 SIB Staff

Sheriff orders County-wide Curfew for LA County

Please visit this link for new curfew Curfew order – June 3, 2020

Sheriff Villanueva Orders County-Wide Curfew for Los Angeles County

In the midst of national chaos, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors proclaimed the existence of a local emergency:  Civil unrest.  The effects of public calamity caused disaster and extreme peril to the safety of people and property.  Because of the dangers which often occur under cover of darkness and the difficulty to preserve public safety during these hours, a curfew was ordered, as allowed by Government Code Section 8634, and signed by Chair Supervisor Kathryn Barger.

At the direction of Sheriff Alex Villanueva, and until further notification, a county-wide curfew was imposed.  Effective as of 6:00 P.M., Sunday, May 31, 2020, until Monday, June 1, 2020 at 6:00 A.M., all incorporated and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County shall adhere to staying off public streets, avenues, boulevards, places, walkways, alleys, parks or any public areas or unimproved private realty within Los Angeles County, between the hours of 6:00 P.M. and 6:00 A.M. the following day.  The county may renew, amend or extend this order, in accordance with California Government Code section 8634 and County Code section 2.68.150.

This order does not apply to peace officers, fire fighters, and National Guard or other military personnel deployed to the area, individuals traveling to and from work, people experiencing homelessness and without access to a viable shelter, and individuals seeking medical treatment.

In the event the county curfew is more stringent than a resident’s local curfew order, the county curfew will supersede it.  In other words, if a resident’s local curfew order is 8:00 P.M., the 6:00 P.M. county curfew supersedes it; if the local order is 4:00 P.M., the local order still stands.  

Any violation of the order is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine not to exceed $1,000 or by imprisonment for a period not to exceed six months, or both, as provided by LACC section 2.68.320 or any applicable state or municipal law.

Executive Order of the Chair of The County of Los Angels Board of Supervisors – PDF

Sheriff Discusses Underfunding, Understaffing 1024 809 SIB Staff

Sheriff Discusses Underfunding, Understaffing

Sheriff Villanueva Discusses Underfunding and Understaffing, Both Dangerous for L.A. County Residents

With overseeing the safety and security needs of more than ten million residents in Los Angeles County –the largest populated county in the nation- Sheriff Alex Villanueva made a startling comparison with the staffing at other policing agencies.

It was during his weekly virtual press conference on Wednesday, May 27, 2020, broadcast from the Hall of Justice that Sheriff Villanueva outlined why staffing levels matter and how being provided an inadequate budget affects it.

Agency                                           Police Officers per 1,000 Residents

Washington D.C. Police Department                        6

New York Police Department                                   4

Chicago Police Department                                     4

Los Angeles Police Department                               2

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department                1 (0.9 actual)

According to the United States Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Investigation Criminal Justice Information System Division, the average rate of sworn officers is 2.4 per 1,000 inhabitants in the nation, which means LASD is running at almost 63% behind the national average. With the largest population and in times of crisis, this could prove to be a risky and dangerous standard. Proper funding equals proper staffing, both necessary for keeping peace and order during challenging times. 

The Sheriff reiterated his invitation to members of the Board of Supervisors, to meet with him and discuss the LASD budget, concerning the entire Los Angeles County budget, to identify priorities and areas of savings. “How does public safety rate in the priorities of each member of the Board of Supervisors and the CEO’s office?” posed Sheriff Villanueva. “We’re going to work with the Board of Supervisors. We’re going to work with the CEO to make sure that we’re as effective and efficient as possible. However, we cannot perform miracles,” he said.

In response to the underfunding proposal and drastic measures necessary to accommodate it, Sheriff Villanueva announced a new attempt to reorganize the entire agency around a new budget, shrunk by 10% than the actual cost of running it. Despite impending alterations, the Sheriff has extended invitations to meet with the Supervisors and CEO to work together on behalf of the Los Angeles County Community.

The impact of COVID-19 on LASD operations, in direct comparison with the same 2019 time frame, shows a 6.57% drop in violent crimes, with a12.5% hike in criminal homicide and a 30.32% plunge in rape reporting. Property crimes had a 6.13% drop, comprised of -6.69% in burglary, -15-93% in larceny-theft, -4.4% in arson, and 25.05% increase in grand theft auto. 

The numbers of 73 total COVID-19-related arrests since Sunday, March 29, 2020, remained unchanged, as did the four total COVID-19-related arrests. Over the 2020 Memorial Day weekend, there were zero citations and zero arrests. The Sheriff attested not only to the credit of law enforcement personnel but also to members of our community, adhering to physical distancing protocols and compliance with health orders.

There are 380 sworn and 135 civilian staff in quarantine related to COVID-19, totaling 515 personnel. Since its inception, 178 sworn and 69 civilian staff tested positive for the virus. Of all those affected by COVID-19, there were 867 sworn and 414 civilian staff who returned to work.

Inmate COVID-19 statistics revealed a downward trend of 5,163 in current quarantine, 242 isolated, and 182 who tested positive for the virus.

Ceremonial flame in front of the Memorial wall
Sheriff Hosts 51st Annual Peace Officers’ Memorial Ceremony 600 750 SIB Staff

Sheriff Hosts 51st Annual Peace Officers’ Memorial Ceremony

Sheriff Villanueva Hosts 51st Annual Peace Officers’ Memorial Ceremony in Virtual, Streamed Event

Despite the circumstances of physical distancing due to COVID-19, the 51st annual Peace Officers’ Memorial Ceremony was observed, to pay tribute to law enforcement partners lost in the line of duty and formally enroll six new names to the memorial wall, located at the Sheriff’s Training Academy and Regional Services (STARS) Center in Whittier.

The Los Angeles County Peace Officers’ Memorial Wall was first dedicated on Friday, May 15, 1970 at Biscailuz Center Training Academy by Sheriff Peter J. Pitchess.  When the wall was first erected, there were 253 names on it; today, it displays 533.  It serves as a constant reminder that we owe these men and women for their noble sacrifice, a debt which can never be fully paid.  The wall is not just a place where we recognize the fallen, but where we also recognize and remember those they left behind.  It is as much in honor of our heroes, as it is for their loved ones who gave the full measure of their devotion and remind us of the sacrifice of the ones who meant so much to them.

Most recently and regrettably lost:

Officer Juan Jose Diaz

Los Angeles Police Department

E.O.W. July 27, 2019

Historical research determined five of the honorees died in the line of duty

between 1886 and 1996:

Deputy Coroner II Michael Anton Shepherd

Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office

E.O.W. April 2, 1996

Deputy Ames Randolph Jones

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department

E.O.W. March 31, 1948

Deputy William Bouett

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department

E.O.W. February 18, 1913

Deputy Constable Francis Marion Culp

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department

E.O.W. June 10, 1906

Town Marshal Rudolph Bohn

Anaheim Marshal’s Office

E.O.W. September 1886

Although the ceremony was not attended by spectators, it was livestreamed on social media platforms so family members, current and law enforcement partners of the past, friends, and the public for whom these lost souls fought, could watch.  The ceremony opened with a traditional military-style drummer and bagpipe hymn, and attention to Colors with a solo accompaniment of our national anthem.

A moving invocation given by Chaplain Phil Reeves held four requests from our Lord, to stir our hearts and make us not only better peace officers, but more compassionate humans:

  • Bless us with discomfort when we see others suffer, so He may live deep within our hearts;
  • Bless us with anger at injustice, suppression and exploitation of people, so we may do His work for justice, freedom and peace;
  • Bless us with tears for those we lost, love and dearly miss, so He may heal the families they left behind and turn our pain into joy;
  • Bless us with enough foolishness, to believe that we can make a difference in the world.

Standing at a lectern next to the memorial flame, Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore extended his appreciation for the ceremony on behalf of his agency and gave his assurance of support, “We stand with you each day, each watch, but also today, as we mourn those who have fallen.”  He recounted the circumstances surrounding the killing of Officer Juan Jose Diaz and lamented the debt of peace for his loss could never be repaid to his family or colleagues. 

Chief of Coroner Investigations, Brian Elias, Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner, recounted the loss of Deputy Coroner II Michael Anton Shepherd, who was remembered for his dedication, compassion and respect he showed to the families he served.  “As peace officers, we are unified in our dedication to perform our sworn duties, committed to a life of public service,” said Chief Elias. 

Sheriff Alex Villanueva thanked Chief Moore and Chief Elias for their attendance and kind words.  He conveyed his honor and privilege to learn the stories of the brave men and women who lost their lives in the line of duty, as the nation observes National Police Week.  He recounted why so many of us chose the law enforcement profession, “…when the outcome seems darkest, our ability to save lives, to change lives, to answer the call of those who need our help.  These are the reasons why we recommit ourselves to the oath we have sworn to uphold.”

The broadcast event concluded with a Missing Man helicopter flyover, bagpipe rendition of “Amazing Grace,” and images of the 2020 honorees and funerals for law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. 

The ceremony was held during a unique, international epoch.  COVID-19 changed the traditional observance of the annual memorial service, but it did not stop us from recounting the memories and honoring the sacrifices of our brave men and women, and their families who lost so much.

Watch Full Event
Sheriff Villanueva’s Weekly Press Briefing 1024 819 SIB Staff

Sheriff Villanueva’s Weekly Press Briefing

As we continue working together through the COVID-19 pandemic, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department staff continue striving to keep the public informed through weekly press conferences, and regularly updating statistics and data on our website, found at https://lasd.org/covid19updates/.

During his weekly virtual press conference on Wednesday, May 20, 2020, livestreamed from the Sherman Block Building, Sheriff Alex Villanueva thanked Los Angeles County residents for their efforts to help protect our personnel from potential COVID-19 exposure.  Because of the nature of law enforcement, there is always a risk of coming in contact with someone who is infected.  Advising desk staff during requests for service if anyone at the location is ill or displaying signs of the virus, filing applicable reports online, and wearing personal protective equipment gives deputies the opportunity to be aware of the circumstances, and helps keep them from becoming ill or transferring sickness to others.

Since inception of the current health crisis, a total of 1,697 personnel were affected by COVID-19, of whom 1,152 were sworn and 545 were civilian staff; there were 189 cases of personnel who tested positive for the virus, of whom 138 were sworn and 51 were civilian staff.  Currently, there are 585 personnel quarantined, of whom 433 are sworn and 152 are civilian staff; there are 51 employees identified as high-risk, of whom 14 are sworn and 37 are civilian staff.  On the positive side, there were 1,049 employees returned to work, 694 of them sworn and 355 civilian personnel. 

The Sheriff pointed out the numbers average one employee quarantined out of every 18, some of them being quarantined twice because of the large and constant risk of exposure in the patrol and custody environments.  He praised their work and willingness to return, despite the risks.  “We have this issue,” said the Sheriff, “that we’re going to be continually exposed to the COVID-19 virus, but that doesn’t mean the job stops.  We are going to continue working.”

Sworn, civilian and medical staff worked diligently to keep a lid on COVID-19 inside our jail facilities.  Correctional Health Services medical staff and/or Department of Public Health employees hold the authority to designate an isolation of an inmate or quarantine of a housing area.  There are 5,145 inmates currently quarantined, 252 current inmates who tested positive, and 337 inmates isolated.

Overall, violent crimes are down by 7%, as compared to the same time last year; criminal homicides are up by 7% and rape reporting dropped 30%.  Property crimes fell by 7%, and, since Sunday, March 29, 2020, there were four COVID-19 arrests made and 73 citations issued. 

Yesterday, Tuesday, May 19, 2020, Sheriff Villanueva testified on the introduction of Assembly Bill 2655, known as AB-2655 for short, and the amendment of California Penal Code 1524, or 1524 P.C.  The passing of AB-2655 would create new penal code section 647.9, which would make it misdemeanor-level crime for first responders to capture the image of a deceased person or portion of their body for any purpose, other than official law enforcement business or the welfare of the general public, by means such as a camera or mobile phone.  Whether the device is their personal equipment or it belongs to their employing agency, using it to capture the images with the intent to invade the person’s privacy, would be punishable by a fine not exceeding $5,000 per violation, imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year, or both. 

The already-existing 1524 P.C. would be amended to reflect authorization of a search warrant to be issued when the property or things to be seized consist of evidence which tend to show a violation of 647.9 P.C. occurred or is occurring.

Lastly, Sheriff Villanueva introduced Mr. Alexander Algar and presented him with the Department’s prestigious and well-deserved Humanitarian Award.  It was on Friday, May 1, 2020, that Alexander helped foil the kidnapping of a six-year-old boy in a Westlake Village Park.  Instead of deciding a situation was not his business or waiting for someone else to do something, Alexander took action when two total strangers needed help right away. 

The hero was enjoying an afternoon in the park when he heard the sound of voices arguing, and saw a man chase a woman and a little boy.  From hearing the yelling and seeing their demeanor, Alexander sensed it was a sinister situation.  The suspect wrenched the little boy out of his mother’s grasp, tucked him under his arm, and walked about 100 feet away with him.  The desperate woman fought against the kidnapper and struggled to get her boy back.  Neighborhood residents yelled for the suspect to let go, but it was Alexander who caused the boy’s release.  Despite the danger to his own safety, Alexander went to the defense of the woman and the little one.  He ran after the fleeing suspect and engaged him in a physical confrontation, in an attempt to gain control of the young victim.  The suspect released the boy and walked away; the neighborhood residents surrounded and detained him until Malibu/Lost Hills Station deputies arrived.  Because of Alexander’s actions, as well as the concerned neighbors, a very thankful woman got to take her son home that day.  Thank you for what you did together to keep our communities safe and safeguard our children!

View this story and watch the press conference below: