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STATEMENT REGARDING MEASURE J 680 380 SIB Staff

STATEMENT REGARDING MEASURE J

STATEMENT REGARDING MEASURE J

November 4, 2020

Our Department has successfully persevered for over 170 years.  Throughout our rich history we have faced many challenges and emerged together stronger, because that is what we do. 

Measure J is our latest challenge and it will be implemented over the next three years, beginning on July 1, 2021.  We don’t yet fully understand the depth of real world consequences to the Department, but we do know it will mean additional reductions to our budget.  Over the next few weeks, our budget team will find out what the impact will actually be. 

I am committed to working together with the Board of Supervisors, CEO, and employee unions in order to find budgetary solutions to the many complex issues we now face. 

As an organization we will continue to remain focused on serving the community in our basic public safety mission of protecting life, protecting property, and maintaining order. 

We have faced far worse challenges and this too shall pass.  We will succeed in navigating this newest challenge together as a family, because that is what we do. 

Sheriff Alex Villanueva

PARKING ENFORCEMENT RESUMES ON NOVEMBER 15, 2020 600 367 SIB Staff

PARKING ENFORCEMENT RESUMES ON NOVEMBER 15, 2020

LOS ANGELES COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT PARKING ENFORCEMENT RESUMES ON NOVEMBER 15, 2020

The stay-at-home order issued in early 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic brought to light the need
for additional parking and a new way to address parking enforcement across Los Angeles County. Understanding
the needs and challenges of those in the communities we serve, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department
Parking Enforcement Detail relaxed parking enforcement to help cope with parking availability and
administrative concerns.


In the face of new challenges to prepare for inclement winter weather, parking enforcement will resume issuing
citations for all parking violations within the public right of way. Beginning Sunday, November 15, 2020, the Los
Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, Parking Enforcement Detail will again issue street sweeping and expired
registration citations, as well as, towing vehicles in the areas we serve across Los Angeles County. To avoid
receiving a parking citation or having a vehicle towed, we urge drivers to be mindful of this change.
Resumed enforcement will include:

  • Street sweeping: All streets with posted signs for street sweeping will be enforced, per 15.20.070(2) LACVC
  • Expired registration: Vehicles with expired registration will be cited for 4000(a)(1)CVC; registrations
    expired in excess of six months, in violation of 4000(a)(1) CVC, will be towed, per 22651 (o)(1)(A) CVC
  • Red tag warnings: Red tag warnings will be issued to vehicles parked on the street not displaying signs of
    movement, including excessive dirt, debris underneath and around the tires, flat tires, missing parts, and
    vandalism. If the vehicle has not been moved after 72 hours or three days, a citation for Abandonment
    Prohibited – 22523(a)(b) CVC will be issued and an additional 48 hours or two days will be given. If the
    vehicle still has not been moved, it will be towed, per 22651(k) CVC.
LASD and LAPD Partner to combat hunger 1024 683 SIB Staff

LASD and LAPD Partner to combat hunger

LASD and LAPD Partner to combat hunger

October 30, 2020, at about 11:30 am, Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva, accompanied by Department members,  LAPD Officers, and LAPD Deputy Chief Jorge Rodriguez held a food drive for community members.
Held at the Greg Smith LAPD Devonshire PALS Youth Center, community members arrived from across the Valley, lining their vehicles to receive donated care baskets and other non-perishable food items. As community members’ vehicles formed an extensive line across lanes of Parthenia Street just east of Wilbur Avenue, deputies and officers were joined by the Devonshire Police Activities League Supporters, Los Angeles City Councilmember John Lee, Members of the LASD Community Advisory Council, and MEND (Meet Each Need with Dignity).  

Hundreds of families expressed their thanks to Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputies and Los Angeles Police Officers as they placed boxes and bags of non-perishable foods into their vehicles. Los Angeles Police Deputy Chief Jorge Rodriguez and Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva also took an active role in handing out food to families. The vehicle traffic went on for a few hours, as more and more community members formed lines and patiently awaited their turn.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department understands the hardship and challenges individuals and families face during these uncertain times. We believe it is our duty to protect our community from crime and lend a helping hand. Economic hardships and life hurdles have affected everyone during this covid-19 outbreak. We hope that this partnership between Los Angeles law enforcement, the city, and our non-profit organizations brings more help to the community in need. It is this dedication to our community that defines the character of our service.
LAPD Officers and LASD Deputies have profound care for the community, and our efforts to curve hunger are a reflection of that sentiment. We hope that this engagement resonates with the community and builds a solid bridge of trust and understanding.

The Sheriff’s Department is thankful to the Temple Ramat Zion, One Generation, the Greater Los Angeles Food Bank, and Goya Foods of California for their generous contributions. A Special Thanks to Jack Kayajian, who dedicated hundreds of volunteered hours and his ability to navigate through the most challenging times, made this event a success.

Sheriff Comments BOS Motion 57H 680 380 SIB Staff

Sheriff Comments BOS Motion 57H

SHERIFF’S COMMENTS – BOS Motion 57-H

10/27/2020

Good Morning and thank you for allowing me this opportunity to share my voice with you and the community.

Regarding this motion, I can agree with two things; accountability and transparency are of the utmost importance. The facts show, I have been more transparent, more accountable, and have offered greater access to the members of our communities than any prior LA County Sheriff.

As you recall, SB 1421 now requires police agencies across the state to release documents that were once considered confidential. As a result, these requests have skyrocketed and the previous administration did not leave any infrastructure in place to meet the avalanche of requests. We requested funding for required compliance staffing and software on six separate occasions from the previous CEO, but were denied each time. Providing this funding will greatly increase the speed and efficiency of these requests.

Transparency and accountability do not come cheap, they are expensive. This is why I have fought so hard regarding budgetary issues. My vision for changing the organizational culture is much more difficult when we are forced to eliminate non-essential positions due to a lack of funding.

The vast majority of problems which have been raised regarding transparency and accountability can be easily solved with a new Memorandum of Agreement between the Sheriff’s Department and the Office of the Inspector General. I whole-heartedly commit to work with you in good faith to achieve this goal.

I request the Board direct the Inspector General to report back on all of the deputy involved shootings that he has participated in since 2014, at the inception of his office. His office has been in each walk-through with the homicide investigators. They’ve attended each Critical Incident Review. Every single Executive Force Review Committee. And, have received the entire deputy involved shooting packet that is provided to the Justice System Integrity Division of the District Attorney’s office. But we have never ever heard back from the Inspector General on a single one of these incidents. Which is important for us, because in case we’re doing something wrong, we need a different perspective, how we can improve, either our service to the community or the quality of our investigations, and to date, we have never received that. All that being said, we are a County family and when there is collaboration we can do great things. Case in point… Body Worn Cameras!

Before the Board votes on this motion, I urge each supervisor to meet with me privately. Let’s set aside the past and work out our differences. This is what good leaders do in trying times like these, because elected office is not about our own likes and dislikes, it is about the people we were elected to serve. I look forward to finding common ground we can all stand together on in the interest of public safety and fiscal responsibility.

Thank you for your time.

Truth about LASD 680 380 SIB Staff

Truth about LASD

THE TRUTH ABOUT LASD
October 16, 2020

On December 3, 2018, I was sworn into office on a promise to Reform, Rebuild, and Restore the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.  After twenty-two months, one pandemic, civil unrest, and an unsupportive political establishment, I can report that we have done exactly that: reform a massive operation where previous sheriffs failed.

ICE has been removed from the jails, patrol stations, and courthouses.  There is a permanent moratorium on all transfers of undocumented inmates to ICE custody.  Federal SCAAP grant funds, previously taken in exchange for selling out the undocumented inmate database, have been summarily rejected.  These milestones alone set me apart from my predecessors, but we didn’t stop there.

Body-worn cameras are now here to stay.  We created a financially feasible program, lobbied hard for its funding, and are now deploying the cameras in the field.  This was my commitment during the campaign and a cornerstone of the LASD’s transparency promise, which now puts all legally permissible information directly in the hands of the community.  The department’s website, lasd.org, now has all information previously hidden from the public’s view, including data on deputy-involved shootings, discipline, conditions of confinement in the jail system, and the impact of COVID-19, along with the entire organization’s rules and regulations.

In a bold departure from past practice, all deputy-involved shootings are thoroughly debriefed and made public at the earliest possible stage of the investigation, including video and physical evidence.  Even during these tragic events, the department reaches out and engages the families involved, along with local civic and religious leaders.  In an effort to ensure the department is a reflection of the community, I banned all out of state recruitment, focusing instead on recruiting and hiring from our own communities.

My efforts at diversity did not end at the entry-level, that was just the beginning.  We’ve redone the entire process to select station commanders, giving civic leaders a major role in the selection process.   All deputies are now required to serve a minimum of four years in their first patrol assignment before being eligible to promote or transfer, cementing my commitment to community policing and changing the culture of the LASD from an enforcement model to an engagement model.  This is a major shift in law enforcement thinking, where the old warrior mindset is now giving way to a focus on community engagement and collaborative problem-solving.

The LASD’s good ole’ boys network is officially DEAD.  I promoted the first two Latinas to the position of Assistant Sheriff and had both serving at the same time.  There are now four female division chiefs, another first, and for the first time in the history of the department, the leadership ranks are now a truly accurate reflection of the rich diversity of our community.  In 2019 alone, I hired over 1,100 deputy sheriff trainees, a huge turnaround for a recruitment and hiring effort that was dead in the water under my predecessor’s administration.  On January 1, 2021, the minimum education standard to apply to become a deputy sheriff will be raised to an Associate’s Degree, the first time this standard has ever been raised.

Before the pandemic struck in March, we took the initiative in February and started a deliberate effort to decompress the nation’s largest jail system.  Working in collaboration with all the criminal justice partners, we released five thousand inmates over the span of the next three months, and in the process established a template for the entire nation to follow.  As a direct result of our aggressive efforts in fighting the COVID-19 threat, we saw only a handful of fatalities and a small positivity rate, all the more remarkable considering the sheer size of our system.

The issue of deputy cliques has long befuddled my predecessors, with reports of misconduct by members of these subgroups stretching back fifty years.  As the first and only sheriff to hold employees accountable for participating in these harmful groups, I implemented a policy that bans their formation and participation in activities that harm the public or their fellow employees.  After transferring dozens of employees, I completed both criminal and administrative investigations that led to the suspension or termination of twenty-six department members.  To date, 68 employees have been terminated, and another 60 internal criminal investigations have resulted in 15 employees being charged by the District Attorney’s Office, based on our own investigations – accountability at its core.

There have been unprecedented challenges, from the tragedy of the helicopter crash that took the lives of Kobe Bryant, his daughter, and seven others in Calabasas.  I created a new policy that protects the dignity of the deceased at crash sites, and sponsored AB 2655, which was signed into law by Governor Newsom last month.  This legislation makes it a crime to take photos of the deceased from accident sites without an authorized purpose. 

We have experienced the tragic Saugus High School shooting, several controversial deputy-involved shootings, and the horrific ambush of our two deputies at the Compton Pax, which captured the attention of the nation due to the heroic efforts of our deputies in overcoming adversity.  In all of these challenges, we rose to the occasion as a team.

The civil unrest that followed the senseless murder of George Floyd resulted in widespread arson, looting, and vandalism across Los Angeles County, but damage was conspicuously absent from all areas patrolled by deputy sheriffs.  This was not by chance.  While protecting the rights of peaceful protestors to assemble and march, we were able to identify and detain those who were using the protests as a cover for riotous actions.

In closing, I will say to those members of the political establishment who wish to lead the charge and demand my resignation, let’s start working together to build a brighter future for all.  To that end, I will continue to maintain laser-focused on serving the community and would love to be joined by the Board of Supervisors in better serving our communities.

Sheriff Alex Villanueva

If you have concerns regarding the above, share your voice.  You may contact your Board of Supervisors at the below:
 County of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors

Hilda L. Solis
Supervisor, First District
Phone: (213) 974-4111
FirstDistrict@bos.lacounty.gov

Mark Ridley-Thomas
Supervisor, Second District
Phone: (213) 974-2222
MarkRidley-Thomas@bos.lacounty.gov

Sheila Kuehl
Supervisor, Third District
Phone: (213) 974-3333
Sheila@bos.lacounty.gov

Janice Hahn
Supervisor, Fourth District
Phone: (213) 974-4444
FourthDistrict@bos.lacounty.gov

Kathryn Barger – CHAIR
Supervisor, Fifth District
Phone: (213) 974-5555
kathryn@bos.lacounty.gov

Not sure who your Supervisor is?  Click Link to Find Out: http://bos.lacounty.gov/About-Us/Board-of-Supervisors

PEACEFUL PROTESTS OF SOLIDARITY 680 380 SIB Staff

PEACEFUL PROTESTS OF SOLIDARITY

PEACEFUL PROTESTS OF SOLIDARITY

October 16,2020

“The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department is monitoring the violence unfolding between Azerbaijan and Armenia which, while, 7,200 miles away from Los Angeles, is of extreme and immediate importance to so many within our community. We hear you and we understand.

In fact, Los Angeles County is home to more people of Armenian descent than anywhere in the world outside of Armenia itself.

We witness, denounce and condemn the violence and attacks occurring upon civilians in Artsakh. 

We welcome peaceful protests of solidarity here in Los Angeles and stand with you in our shared demand for peace.

LASD Sheriff's Department Logo
COC CALLS FOR SHERIFF RESIGNATION 800 170 SIB Staff

COC CALLS FOR SHERIFF RESIGNATION

COC CALLS FOR SHERIFF’S RESIGNATION… AGAIN!

OCTOBER 15, 2020

Sheriff Villanueva has lawfully responded to all subpoenas from the COC, and has just recently met with the COC Chair to discuss building a better working relationship. A LASD captain, and a subject matter expert when requested, has attended every COC meeting. This meritless politically motivated attack is unsupported by real facts and remains a shameless repeat of the same spectacle played out on September 17, 2020. Despite this political theater, Sheriff Villanueva will continue being the most accessible and transparent sheriff in the history of Los Angeles County.

MAX HUNTSMAN OMITS THE FACTS ONCE AGAIN 680 380 SIB Staff

MAX HUNTSMAN OMITS THE FACTS ONCE AGAIN

MAX HUNTSMAN OMITS THE FACTS ONCE AGAIN

October 5, 2020

Today, I learned of the latest Office of Inspector General (OIG) report.  Conspicuously absent from the report is the fact the OIG had multiple opportunities to address the “Banditos” issue during the four years under my predecessor but chose to remain silent.  This is because his job as a political appointee is to do whatever the Board instructs him to do.  Mr. Huntsman now claims the past is the present, while willfully omitting all of the progress which has been made.  His actions are purely politically driven and an attempt to undermine the reputation of the Department.

The report alleges investigators did not conduct a thorough investigation into the Kennedy Hall deputy on deputy fight.  This is false.  Both criminal and administrative investigations were conducted where investigators interviewed over 70 involved parties and witnesses in the case.  In addition, this case was submitted to the District Attorney’s Justice System Integrity Division (JSID) for their review and their office concluded there was insufficient evidence to prove the case beyond a reasonable doubt.

The facts are that immediately after taking office, I relieved the East Los Angeles Station captain of his command, overhauled the entire leadership of the station, and transferred 36 personnel.  In February of 2020, I became the first and only sheriff to successfully implement a policy specifically addressing employee groups which violate the rights of other employees or members of the public.

On August 13, 2020, at the conclusion of the Kennedy Hall fight between deputies investigation, I held a press conference to publish the results of the investigation for the public.  Twenty-six deputies involved in that early morning fight were either suspended or terminated.  As has become his pattern, Mr. Huntsman seems to have once again intentionally omitted facts which do not further his political agenda. 

Please view our August 13, 2020, press conference: 

Sheriff Alex Villanueva

If you have concerns regarding the above, share your voice.  You may contact your Board of Supervisors at the below:

Hilda L. Solis
Supervisor, First District
Phone: (213) 974-4111
FirstDistrict@bos.lacounty.gov

Mark Ridley-Thomas
Supervisor, Second District
Phone: (213) 974-2222
MarkRidley-Thomas@bos.lacounty.gov

Sheila Kuehl
Supervisor, Third District
Phone: (213) 974-3333
Sheila@bos.lacounty.gov

Janice Hahn
Supervisor, Fourth District
Phone: (213) 974-4444
FourthDistrict@bos.lacounty.gov

Kathryn Barger – CHAIR
Supervisor, Fifth District
Phone: (213) 974-5555
kathryn@bos.lacounty.gov

Not sure who your Supervisor is?  Click Link to Find Out: http://bos.lacounty.gov/About-Us/Board-of-Supervisors

COUNTY CONTINUES TO DEFUND LAW ENFORCEMENT 680 380 SIB Staff

COUNTY CONTINUES TO DEFUND LAW ENFORCEMENT

THE COUNTY CONTINUES TO DEFUND LAW ENFORCEMENT

October 1, 2020

On September 29, 2020, the Board of Supervisors continued their campaign to defund the LASD by approving a supplemental budget which eliminates an additional $105M from an already depleted budget.  This money is being diverted to support criminal offender support programs such as the Alternatives to Incarceration (ATI) initiative, at the expense of patrol, detective, and custody resources that keep the community safe.

The Board has a long history of underfunding the Department’s budget. This $105M budget cut follows last year’s cuts and has resulted in the elimination of 1,281 budgeted positions.  Some of the positions defunded were Youth Activities League (YAL) Deputies, School Resource Deputies, Crime Prevention Teams, and Detective positions.  The reductions applied to Custody will now result in the closure of a medium security jail and the transfer of 700 inmates to other facilities, increasing the risk of COVID-19 exposure throughout the entire jail system.  Additionally, Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas made a motion to defund our budget an additional $23.9M and eliminate the presence of our deputies in all Los Angeles County parks, which will have a devastating impact to public safety and the community’s willingness to use our parks.

Bottom Line: Major cities all over the U.S. are being vandalized and burned by those committed to violence; it is against all logic and common sense for our elected officials to defund public safety.  I believe the “defund movement” is the priority of a small number of radical special interest groups, not the majority of Los Angeles County residents. 

Sheriff Alex Villanueva

LASD Sheriff's Department Logo
RESPONSE TO THE COC MOTION CALLING FOR SHERIFF VILLANUEVA’S RESIGNATION 800 170 SIB Staff

RESPONSE TO THE COC MOTION CALLING FOR SHERIFF VILLANUEVA’S RESIGNATION

RESPONSE TO THE COC MOTION CALLING FOR SHERIFF ALEX VILLANUEVA’S RESIGNATION

September 17, 2020

The Sheriff’s Department received word that several members of the Civilian Oversight Commission are calling for the resignation of the sheriff, who is an elected public servant.  The fact this motion is even being considered, particularly when two members of our department are recovering from a life-threatening ambush, is morally repugnant and emblematic of the political animosity of the politically-appointed commission.

It is becoming painfully obvious this commission is acting in retaliation against the sheriff for his efforts in investigating potential criminal conduct from county officials and for challenging the legality of subpoenaing the sheriff himself versus the LASD.  The sheriff will remain focused on serving the residents of Los Angeles County as he leads the department in investigating the ambush, overseeing the response to the Bobcat Fire evacuations, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic’s impact to the jail system.