Captain Lewis Los Angeles County Sheriff's Station Santa Clarita Valley Station

Capt. Robert Lewis

Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff's Station

(661) 255-1121
23740 Magic Mountain Parkway Santa Clarita, CA 91355

Serving the areas of: Angeles National Forest, Bouquet Canyon, Canyon Country, Castaic, City of Santa Clarita, Gorman, Hasley Canyon, Newhall, Neenach, Sand Canyon, Santa Clarita, Saugus, Six Flags Magic Mountain, Sleepy Valley, Southern Oaks, Stevenson Ranch, Sunset Point, Tesoro del Valle, Valencia, Val Verde, West Hills, Westridge.

Palmdale Sheriff's Station

(661) 272-2400
750 East Avenue Q, Palmdale, CA 93550

Serving the areas of: Acton, Agua Dulce, Big Pines / Wrightwood, Green Valley, Lake Elizabeth, Lake Hughes, Leona Valley, Littlerock, Llano, Palmdale, Pearblossom, Vallyermo, Vasquez Rocks.

Captain Lewis Los Angeles County Sheriff's Station Santa Clarita Valley Station

Capt. Robert Lewis

Information and Updates

Missing Monday Mary Spears

#MissingMonday: Spears

#MissingMonday: Spears 400 400 SIB Staff

#MissingMonday Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Missing Persons Unit Investigators are asking for the public’s help locating Mary Elsie Spears She was last seen leaving her home on the 44600…

read more
Deputies holding blue lights in front of capital at night

SO CAL PEACE OFFICERS’ MEMORIAL.

SO CAL PEACE OFFICERS’ MEMORIAL. 400 286 SIB Staff

#LASD IS PROUD TO ATTEND THE SO CAL CALIFORNIA PEACE OFFICERS’ MEMORIAL. #LASD is proud to attend the So Cal California Peace Officers’ Memorial 2019 in Sacramento this week, along…

read more

Updated Information

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

4 hours ago

Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff's Station

... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Thank you

🖤 LEO's 🇱🇷

You guys are like Superman you're just there when everybody needs you thank you

9 hours ago

Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff's Station

#ThrowbackThursday #LASD Deputies may experience extreme highs and lows during the same working shift. One minute they are typing a report and the next they are responding to an emergency. Counted on for their independent processing skills, deputies have to assess and solve problems quickly using their accumulated training experience and life skills. Their performance may sometimes make a difference between life and death.

Countless deputies have responded to emergent calls concerning babies throughout the past 168 years. In the early 70s, Deputy Rick Gonzalez and Sergeant Bill Stonich delivered a baby in the back seat of a compact car, which was located in the rear parking lot of East Los Angeles Sheriff’s Station. Little Juan Ortiz became the first baby delivered at ELA Station.

In 2018, Lakewood Deputy Milton discovered an unresponsive 9-month-old baby during a traffic stop. He immediately summoned help from other deputies. Deputy Farrington quickly arrived to assist. In seconds, they rushed the baby to the nearest hospital in their patrol vehicle. While Deputy Farrington drove, Deputy Milton administered CPR and was able to resuscitate the infant prior to arriving at the hospital. Deputy Milton and Deputy Farrington’s fast actions and great judgment saved the baby’s life.

Being a good deputy sheriff is not just about physical skill. Emotional intelligence plays a unique role in law enforcement work. To keep a clear head while in high-risk situations is a critical skill that sets law enforcement officers apart. In a split second, the soul of bravery shows the heart of a deputy sheriff. When you need help, we are here.
... See MoreSee Less

Load more

Nixle

Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

4 hours ago

Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff's Station

... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Thank you

🖤 LEO's 🇱🇷

You guys are like Superman you're just there when everybody needs you thank you

9 hours ago

Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff's Station

#ThrowbackThursday #LASD Deputies may experience extreme highs and lows during the same working shift. One minute they are typing a report and the next they are responding to an emergency. Counted on for their independent processing skills, deputies have to assess and solve problems quickly using their accumulated training experience and life skills. Their performance may sometimes make a difference between life and death.

Countless deputies have responded to emergent calls concerning babies throughout the past 168 years. In the early 70s, Deputy Rick Gonzalez and Sergeant Bill Stonich delivered a baby in the back seat of a compact car, which was located in the rear parking lot of East Los Angeles Sheriff’s Station. Little Juan Ortiz became the first baby delivered at ELA Station.

In 2018, Lakewood Deputy Milton discovered an unresponsive 9-month-old baby during a traffic stop. He immediately summoned help from other deputies. Deputy Farrington quickly arrived to assist. In seconds, they rushed the baby to the nearest hospital in their patrol vehicle. While Deputy Farrington drove, Deputy Milton administered CPR and was able to resuscitate the infant prior to arriving at the hospital. Deputy Milton and Deputy Farrington’s fast actions and great judgment saved the baby’s life.

Being a good deputy sheriff is not just about physical skill. Emotional intelligence plays a unique role in law enforcement work. To keep a clear head while in high-risk situations is a critical skill that sets law enforcement officers apart. In a split second, the soul of bravery shows the heart of a deputy sheriff. When you need help, we are here.
... See MoreSee Less

Load more

Additional Information and Links

Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Foundation assists local law enforcement.

This volunteer organization was formed in 1984 by local citizens to assist local law enforcement in a tangible way, purchasing equipment and crime prevention materials, as well as raising funds to help the Civilian Volunteer, Law Enforcement Explorer, and Reserve Deputy Programs at the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station.

Our Sheriff’s Explorer Program has created a volunteer partnership between youths in our community and law enforcement. The explorers, between 15 and 21 years of age, receive extensive training in an academy setting.

They then participate in community affairs and non-hazardous law enforcement activities. The explorer program is great for those youth considering a future career in law enforcement or those who just want to get involved and help out.

If you are interested in working as a Sheriff’s Explorer, please fill out the Deputy Sheriff Explorer Interest Form, or at the bottom of this page or contact Deputy Fanny Lapkin of the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station at (661) 255-1121 x5160. Those who are interested in the Sheriff’s Explorer program, but do not wish to apply for the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station, should print the Interest Form and apply to the LA County Sheriff’s station of their preference.

Mission Statement/About Us

In 2010 nationwide trends and local concerns prompted officials from the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station in partner with the City of Santa Clarita and the County of Los Angeles to conduct a thorough assessment into the scope of the narcotic epidemic in the Santa Clarita Valley. To address this issue The Santa Clarita Sheriff Station and the city of Santa Clarita developed and implemented the J-TEAM.

The J-Team was formed to direct concentrated attention at both juvenile and adult narcotic addiction and its primary function is to address the growing narcotic problem through education, Intervention, and Enforcement. The J-Teams approach is multi-directional, considering both the addict and their families, including detox, counseling, IOP (Intensive Outpatient Program), Residential or rehab in other states.

J-Team Contact Information
Santa Clarita Valley Station
(661) 255-1121
Sgt. Tim Vander Leek – Ext. 5198
Det. Bill Velek – Ext. 5163
Intervention Specialist Travis Sabadin – 4417