Captain Berg. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department San Dimas Station

Captain
Andrew Berg

San Dimas Sheriff's Station

(909) 450-2700
270 S Walnut Ave. San Dimas, CA 91773-2646

Serving the areas of: City of San Dimas, Unincorporated Communities of: Covina, Azusa, Glendora, La Verne, Claremont, Azusa Canyon, Mount Baldy, Angeles National Forest (State Route 39).

San Dimas Sheriff's Station

(909) 450-2700
270 S Walnut Ave. San Dimas, CA 91773-2646

Serving the areas of: City of San Dimas, Unincorporated Communities of: Covina, Azusa, Glendora, La Verne, Claremont, Azusa Canyon, Mount Baldy, Angeles National Forest (State Route 39).

Captain Berg. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department San Dimas Station

Captain
Andrew Berg

Information and Updates

Missing Monday Mary Spears

#MissingMonday: Spears

#MissingMonday: Spears 400 400 SIB Staff

#MissingMonday Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Missing Persons Unit Investigators are asking for the public’s help locating Mary Elsie Spears She was last seen leaving her home on the 44600…

read more
Deputies holding blue lights in front of capital at night

SO CAL PEACE OFFICERS’ MEMORIAL.

SO CAL PEACE OFFICERS’ MEMORIAL. 400 286 SIB Staff

#LASD IS PROUD TO ATTEND THE SO CAL CALIFORNIA PEACE OFFICERS’ MEMORIAL. #LASD is proud to attend the So Cal California Peace Officers’ Memorial 2019 in Sacramento this week, along…

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Updated Information

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
#CrimeTimeTuesday Law Enforcement Agencies Collaborate and Man is Sentenced to LWOP for 2010 Home Invasion Murders

#LASD, @HawthornePD, and @LAPDHQ investigated the brutal murders and home robberies of Hanna Marcos, Denice Roberts, and Leamon & Robyn Turnage between September 2010 and October 2010.  

John Wesley Ewell, a 62 year-old man pled no contest to four counts of first-degree murder and four counts of first-degree residential robbery in a negotiated plea agreement, which included admitting special circumstance allegation of murder during a residential robbery.  He was sentenced to life in state prison without the possibility of parole.    

September 24, 2010, Suspect Ewell broke into the Hawthorne home of 80 year-old Hanna Marcos.  Before he robbed her home, Ewell choked and hit Ms. Marcos causing her to have a heart attack resulting in her death.  

October 13, 2010, Ewell broke into, 53 year-old, Denice Roberts Los Angeles home and strangled her to death during the robbery.  

October 22, 2010, Ewell broke into the Hawthorne home of 69 year-old Leamon Turnage, and his 57 year-old wife, Robyn.  He robbed their house and then killed the couple by hitting and strangling them.  They were found bound.  

Detectives conducted an intensive investigation and doggedly followed all leads and John Wesley Ewell was taken into custody without incident.  Thanks to the combined effort and teamwork of the involved agencies, this dangerous suspect will no longer be able to violently victimize innocent members of society.

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Comment on Facebook

Good al tambo !!

“When should I call the Sheriffs Station?”  - A Guide for Residents

The battle against crime is the combined efforts of police and community members.  Because police cannot be all places, all times, your Sheriffs Department is dependent on community cooperation in the fight against crime.  Many crimes could be prevented if more citizens would be alert for suspicious activity and take appropriate measures to notify police. 

When or why should I call?
If you observe suspicious activity, even though you may not be the only witness, take the initiative and call us.  Do not rely on someone else to act - this may never happen.  You could be the only caller, and police questioning the individuals seen lurking in or repeatedly traveling through areas often deters crimes. Many people fail to act because they are not sure if what they are observing is worth reporting or afraid of retaliation.  When in doubt, call the Sheriffs or police immediately.  Dont lose precious time discussing the event with friends or neighbors first.

How Do I Report a Crime?
If you suspect that a crime is in progress, or is about to be committed, please dial 
9-1-1. You need not give your name.  However, if you want a police officer to contact you, give your name, address, and telephone number and tell the Dispatcher that you would like to meet with an officer.  

As always, please feel free to call about any violations of the law, traffic problems, illegal parking, etc.  The San Dimas Sheriffs station phone number is (909)450-2700.  It would also be helpful if theres a responsible adult who might sign a complaint about specific violations.  Its not always required for us to take action - and we will take action - but some violations require a signed complaint by a witness for us to issue a citation or make an arrest.  You may remain anonymous, but in some cases we have more legal authority if we are able to obtain follow up statements from you.  

What is suspicious activity?
 A stranger around your neighbors house or a strange vehicle parked near your neighbors home.
 The sound of breaking glass.
 Anyone peering into vehicles or removing tags, gasoline, or auto parts.
 An improperly parked car, or a parked car with someone in it who seems out of place.
 Someone carrying property such as TVs, stereos, or tools that can used to break into homes.
 Apparent business transactions conducted from a vehicle or street corner.
 A constant flow of strangers to and from a particular house on a regular basis, especially during late evening hours.
 Persons involved in a fight or any explosion or scream.
 Door-to-door solicitations or any stranger knocking on doors (burglars sometimes knock at the door first to see if anyone is at home).
 Recurring appearances of a strange vehicle in the neighborhood.
 Persons standing around, possibly acting as lookouts.

Burglar in your home?
 If you return home and believe that someone may have broken in while you were away:
 Leave immediately! Do not enter your home!
 Go to a neighbors house or some other location and dial the emergency number for the police, 9-1-1.
 Wait for the police; do not return to your home until officers have checked it.

Call Prioritization
To ensure a rapid response when you need it, law enforcement agencies have a call priority system.  High priority calls consist of situations where lives may be endangered, in progress crimes, or those recently committed where there is a chance of apprehending a suspect.  As the call taker is asking questions, the information is being made available to the dispatchers for relay to the deputy sheriff on the street.  It is important to continue talking with the dispatcher, answering questions and providing additional information as accurately as possible.
 
Hang ups
When 9-1-1 is dialed and the calling party hangs up, an officer is sent to the address.  With the 9-1-1 system used in Los Angeles County, the address of the telephone from where the call is being made appears on the dispatcher’s computer terminal.  Please ensure that children do not play with your telephone.  

Lower priority calls consist of reports of property crimes that occurred some time ago and suspects have left the scene.  These calls are dispatched based on available units and may take a little longer.  
 
Reasons Some People Give for Not Reporting Suspected Criminal Activity

Reason: Its none of my business
Fact: You may be the next victim.
 
Reason: Someone else may be reporting it.
Consider: Maybe not.
 
Reason: The police are too busy.
Consider: Calls of in-progress crimes or suspicious activity are always important.
 
Reason: That noise may not be anything.
Consider: If so, why did it attract your attention?
 
Reason: That unknown person may be visiting the neighbors.
Consider: Maybe not. Its best to be certain.
 
Reason: That strange car may just be lost.
Consider: There may be a crime about to occur.
 
Reason: The stranger at your door seems friendly, he or she was just lost.
Consider: This is how some burglars determine if anyone is home.

Reason: I could be wrong, and there is no crime occurring.
Consider: Maybe not. But then again, no harm is done by investigating it.

Reason: The criminals might retaliate if I report them.
Consider: Though this could occur, experience indicates this happens in extremely rare cases.
 
Reason: I do not care what happens off my property.
Consider: Apathy breeds crime. You could be next.
 
Reason: It is the Sheriffs job, not mine.
Consider: The police depend on residents to be the eyes and ears on the street.
 
Reason: I am the victim and do not want to report it because it was just a minor theft.
Consider: It could be part of a developing pattern and the police need to know about it.
 
How to call the San Dimas Sheriff’s Station:  
1. Dial 9-1-1 for emergencies, or (909) 450-2700 for non-emergencies or to ask questions.  Program this number in your cell phone!  (909) 450-2700
2. Quickly describe why you are calling. We will ask a lot of questions!
3. Give your name, address, and phone number, if you so desire.
4. Give detailed suspect or vehicle description and last known location or direction of travel.
5. Stay calm. Remain on the phone to give any additional information.
6. When in doubt, call 9-1-1.
7. Call from a LANDLINE if possible - Cell phone calls are routed based on cell tower location.  Calls near freeways go to CHP; calls near jurisdiction boundaries got to the “logical” agency.
8. If you call from a cell phone and get the wrong agency they can transfer quickly.  In this jurisdiction, you may call us directly at (909)450-2700. 
9. It is not recommended to call fire stations directly. They might not be there!
 
Public Safety is everybodys business!  THANK YOU!!

************************************ 
SAN DIMAS STATION
 
San Dimas Sheriff’s Station is one of six stations within the East Patrol Division of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. The Station’s jurisdiction encompasses approximately 276 square miles. In addition to serving the City of San Dimas, the station serves unincorporated communities of Azusa, Covina, Glendora, La Verne, Claremont, Pomona, the Los Angeles County portion of Mt. Baldy, a large portion of the Angeles National Forest (State Route 39), and portions of Angeles Crest Highway (Highway 2). The population for these areas is approximately one hundred and five thousand (105,000), nearly sixty sixty-nine thousand (69,000) in the unincorporated areas and more than thirty-six thousand (36,000) in the City of San Dimas. 

San Dimas Sheriff’s Station
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department
270 S. Walnut Avenue
San Dimas, CA 91773
(909) 450-2700

Nextdoor: https://nextdoor.com/ 
Instagram: LASD - San Dimas Station: @sdmlasd 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SDMLASD    https://twitter.com/LASDAndy
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SanDimasSheriffsStation
Website: http://www.SanDimas.lasd.org

LASD Text & Email (Register at http://www.Nixle.com :
http://local.nixle.com/lasd---san-dimas-station-los-angeles-county-sheriff/
 
LASD HEADQUARTERS:
Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department 
Sheriffs Information Bureau - Newsroom (213)229-1700 

Email: SHBNewsroom@lasd.org 
Website: http://www.lasd.org 
Follow us at: Text and Emails, LASD HQ: http://www.Nixle.com 
http://nixle.com/lasd----hq-newsroom-shb-los-angeles-county-sheriff/ 
Twitter: @LASDHQ http://twitter.com/LASDHQ 
Twitter: @LASDtalk https://twitter.com/LASDTalk 
Twitter: @LASDvideos https://twitter.com/LASDvideos 
Twitter: @LASDespanol https://twitter.com/LASDespanol 
Facebook LASD HQ: http://www.facebook.com/LosAngelesCountySheriffsDepartment 
Instagram LASD Photos: http://instagram.com/LASDHQ 
Pinterest LASD Photos: http://pinterest.com/lacountysheriff/ 
YouTube LASD Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/LACountySheriff/videos?view=0 
Alert LA County: Telephone emergency mass notification system http://www.lacounty.gov/wps/portal/alertla 
 
Text & Email, Register for LASD Nixle messages: To receive more detailed, up-to-date information via E-MAIL and/or TEXT directly from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD), sign up for Nixle alerts at http://www.Nixle.com and register for LASD – Headquarters Newsroom (SHB), Los Angeles County Sheriff AND your local LASD station area. Or, to receive URGENT TEXT ALERTS ONLY, text your zip code to 888777. Standard text messaging rates may apply depending on your calling plan. 
 
If You See Something, Say Something
LA Crime Stoppers: Partner to prevent or report crime by contacting your local Sheriff’s station. Or if you wish to remain Anonymous, call “LA Crime Stoppers” by dialing 800-222-TIPS (8477), texting the letters TIPLA plus your tip to CRIMES (274637), or using the website http://lacrimestoppers.org 

(Photos courtesy of Chris Miller.)

Alex Villanueva, Sheriff
Los Angeles County Sheriffs DepartmentImage attachmentImage attachment

... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

I liked to but after being told....in the past at the sheriff's dept in san dimas that I was told there is no one available, what do you want us to do about it, or I like the one where they say its not our jurisdiction and then it takes you on an endless transfer of different agencies. :/ Idk honestly if I'd call. Its' sad. 🙁

Thank you for your service. And please lord protect our officers daily from evils.

Thank you for all your team is doing to keep us safe.

Thank you San Dimas Sheriffs....

Thank you for your service, God bless you all for what you do!

Los Angeles county needs to accept, review, and process CCW permits to all citizens with “simple self defense” as enough just cause for approval.

Excellent. People don’t talk yourself out of calling police!

Stay Safe

Danielle Espinoza

View more comments

Load more

Nixle

Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
#CrimeTimeTuesday Law Enforcement Agencies Collaborate and Man is Sentenced to LWOP for 2010 Home Invasion Murders

#LASD, @HawthornePD, and @LAPDHQ investigated the brutal murders and home robberies of Hanna Marcos, Denice Roberts, and Leamon & Robyn Turnage between September 2010 and October 2010.  

John Wesley Ewell, a 62 year-old man pled no contest to four counts of first-degree murder and four counts of first-degree residential robbery in a negotiated plea agreement, which included admitting special circumstance allegation of murder during a residential robbery.  He was sentenced to life in state prison without the possibility of parole.    

September 24, 2010, Suspect Ewell broke into the Hawthorne home of 80 year-old Hanna Marcos.  Before he robbed her home, Ewell choked and hit Ms. Marcos causing her to have a heart attack resulting in her death.  

October 13, 2010, Ewell broke into, 53 year-old, Denice Roberts Los Angeles home and strangled her to death during the robbery.  

October 22, 2010, Ewell broke into the Hawthorne home of 69 year-old Leamon Turnage, and his 57 year-old wife, Robyn.  He robbed their house and then killed the couple by hitting and strangling them.  They were found bound.  

Detectives conducted an intensive investigation and doggedly followed all leads and John Wesley Ewell was taken into custody without incident.  Thanks to the combined effort and teamwork of the involved agencies, this dangerous suspect will no longer be able to violently victimize innocent members of society.

... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Good al tambo !!

“When should I call the Sheriffs Station?”  - A Guide for Residents

The battle against crime is the combined efforts of police and community members.  Because police cannot be all places, all times, your Sheriffs Department is dependent on community cooperation in the fight against crime.  Many crimes could be prevented if more citizens would be alert for suspicious activity and take appropriate measures to notify police. 

When or why should I call?
If you observe suspicious activity, even though you may not be the only witness, take the initiative and call us.  Do not rely on someone else to act - this may never happen.  You could be the only caller, and police questioning the individuals seen lurking in or repeatedly traveling through areas often deters crimes. Many people fail to act because they are not sure if what they are observing is worth reporting or afraid of retaliation.  When in doubt, call the Sheriffs or police immediately.  Dont lose precious time discussing the event with friends or neighbors first.

How Do I Report a Crime?
If you suspect that a crime is in progress, or is about to be committed, please dial 
9-1-1. You need not give your name.  However, if you want a police officer to contact you, give your name, address, and telephone number and tell the Dispatcher that you would like to meet with an officer.  

As always, please feel free to call about any violations of the law, traffic problems, illegal parking, etc.  The San Dimas Sheriffs station phone number is (909)450-2700.  It would also be helpful if theres a responsible adult who might sign a complaint about specific violations.  Its not always required for us to take action - and we will take action - but some violations require a signed complaint by a witness for us to issue a citation or make an arrest.  You may remain anonymous, but in some cases we have more legal authority if we are able to obtain follow up statements from you.  

What is suspicious activity?
 A stranger around your neighbors house or a strange vehicle parked near your neighbors home.
 The sound of breaking glass.
 Anyone peering into vehicles or removing tags, gasoline, or auto parts.
 An improperly parked car, or a parked car with someone in it who seems out of place.
 Someone carrying property such as TVs, stereos, or tools that can used to break into homes.
 Apparent business transactions conducted from a vehicle or street corner.
 A constant flow of strangers to and from a particular house on a regular basis, especially during late evening hours.
 Persons involved in a fight or any explosion or scream.
 Door-to-door solicitations or any stranger knocking on doors (burglars sometimes knock at the door first to see if anyone is at home).
 Recurring appearances of a strange vehicle in the neighborhood.
 Persons standing around, possibly acting as lookouts.

Burglar in your home?
 If you return home and believe that someone may have broken in while you were away:
 Leave immediately! Do not enter your home!
 Go to a neighbors house or some other location and dial the emergency number for the police, 9-1-1.
 Wait for the police; do not return to your home until officers have checked it.

Call Prioritization
To ensure a rapid response when you need it, law enforcement agencies have a call priority system.  High priority calls consist of situations where lives may be endangered, in progress crimes, or those recently committed where there is a chance of apprehending a suspect.  As the call taker is asking questions, the information is being made available to the dispatchers for relay to the deputy sheriff on the street.  It is important to continue talking with the dispatcher, answering questions and providing additional information as accurately as possible.
 
Hang ups
When 9-1-1 is dialed and the calling party hangs up, an officer is sent to the address.  With the 9-1-1 system used in Los Angeles County, the address of the telephone from where the call is being made appears on the dispatcher’s computer terminal.  Please ensure that children do not play with your telephone.  

Lower priority calls consist of reports of property crimes that occurred some time ago and suspects have left the scene.  These calls are dispatched based on available units and may take a little longer.  
 
Reasons Some People Give for Not Reporting Suspected Criminal Activity

Reason: Its none of my business
Fact: You may be the next victim.
 
Reason: Someone else may be reporting it.
Consider: Maybe not.
 
Reason: The police are too busy.
Consider: Calls of in-progress crimes or suspicious activity are always important.
 
Reason: That noise may not be anything.
Consider: If so, why did it attract your attention?
 
Reason: That unknown person may be visiting the neighbors.
Consider: Maybe not. Its best to be certain.
 
Reason: That strange car may just be lost.
Consider: There may be a crime about to occur.
 
Reason: The stranger at your door seems friendly, he or she was just lost.
Consider: This is how some burglars determine if anyone is home.

Reason: I could be wrong, and there is no crime occurring.
Consider: Maybe not. But then again, no harm is done by investigating it.

Reason: The criminals might retaliate if I report them.
Consider: Though this could occur, experience indicates this happens in extremely rare cases.
 
Reason: I do not care what happens off my property.
Consider: Apathy breeds crime. You could be next.
 
Reason: It is the Sheriffs job, not mine.
Consider: The police depend on residents to be the eyes and ears on the street.
 
Reason: I am the victim and do not want to report it because it was just a minor theft.
Consider: It could be part of a developing pattern and the police need to know about it.
 
How to call the San Dimas Sheriff’s Station:  
1. Dial 9-1-1 for emergencies, or (909) 450-2700 for non-emergencies or to ask questions.  Program this number in your cell phone!  (909) 450-2700
2. Quickly describe why you are calling. We will ask a lot of questions!
3. Give your name, address, and phone number, if you so desire.
4. Give detailed suspect or vehicle description and last known location or direction of travel.
5. Stay calm. Remain on the phone to give any additional information.
6. When in doubt, call 9-1-1.
7. Call from a LANDLINE if possible - Cell phone calls are routed based on cell tower location.  Calls near freeways go to CHP; calls near jurisdiction boundaries got to the “logical” agency.
8. If you call from a cell phone and get the wrong agency they can transfer quickly.  In this jurisdiction, you may call us directly at (909)450-2700. 
9. It is not recommended to call fire stations directly. They might not be there!
 
Public Safety is everybodys business!  THANK YOU!!

************************************ 
SAN DIMAS STATION
 
San Dimas Sheriff’s Station is one of six stations within the East Patrol Division of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. The Station’s jurisdiction encompasses approximately 276 square miles. In addition to serving the City of San Dimas, the station serves unincorporated communities of Azusa, Covina, Glendora, La Verne, Claremont, Pomona, the Los Angeles County portion of Mt. Baldy, a large portion of the Angeles National Forest (State Route 39), and portions of Angeles Crest Highway (Highway 2). The population for these areas is approximately one hundred and five thousand (105,000), nearly sixty sixty-nine thousand (69,000) in the unincorporated areas and more than thirty-six thousand (36,000) in the City of San Dimas. 

San Dimas Sheriff’s Station
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department
270 S. Walnut Avenue
San Dimas, CA 91773
(909) 450-2700

Nextdoor: https://nextdoor.com/ 
Instagram: LASD - San Dimas Station: @sdmlasd 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SDMLASD    https://twitter.com/LASDAndy
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SanDimasSheriffsStation
Website: http://www.SanDimas.lasd.org

LASD Text & Email (Register at http://www.Nixle.com :
http://local.nixle.com/lasd---san-dimas-station-los-angeles-county-sheriff/
 
LASD HEADQUARTERS:
Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department 
Sheriffs Information Bureau - Newsroom (213)229-1700 

Email: SHBNewsroom@lasd.org 
Website: http://www.lasd.org 
Follow us at: Text and Emails, LASD HQ: http://www.Nixle.com 
http://nixle.com/lasd----hq-newsroom-shb-los-angeles-county-sheriff/ 
Twitter: @LASDHQ http://twitter.com/LASDHQ 
Twitter: @LASDtalk https://twitter.com/LASDTalk 
Twitter: @LASDvideos https://twitter.com/LASDvideos 
Twitter: @LASDespanol https://twitter.com/LASDespanol 
Facebook LASD HQ: http://www.facebook.com/LosAngelesCountySheriffsDepartment 
Instagram LASD Photos: http://instagram.com/LASDHQ 
Pinterest LASD Photos: http://pinterest.com/lacountysheriff/ 
YouTube LASD Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/LACountySheriff/videos?view=0 
Alert LA County: Telephone emergency mass notification system http://www.lacounty.gov/wps/portal/alertla 
 
Text & Email, Register for LASD Nixle messages: To receive more detailed, up-to-date information via E-MAIL and/or TEXT directly from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD), sign up for Nixle alerts at http://www.Nixle.com and register for LASD – Headquarters Newsroom (SHB), Los Angeles County Sheriff AND your local LASD station area. Or, to receive URGENT TEXT ALERTS ONLY, text your zip code to 888777. Standard text messaging rates may apply depending on your calling plan. 
 
If You See Something, Say Something
LA Crime Stoppers: Partner to prevent or report crime by contacting your local Sheriff’s station. Or if you wish to remain Anonymous, call “LA Crime Stoppers” by dialing 800-222-TIPS (8477), texting the letters TIPLA plus your tip to CRIMES (274637), or using the website http://lacrimestoppers.org 

(Photos courtesy of Chris Miller.)

Alex Villanueva, Sheriff
Los Angeles County Sheriffs DepartmentImage attachmentImage attachment

... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

I liked to but after being told....in the past at the sheriff's dept in san dimas that I was told there is no one available, what do you want us to do about it, or I like the one where they say its not our jurisdiction and then it takes you on an endless transfer of different agencies. :/ Idk honestly if I'd call. Its' sad. 🙁

Thank you for your service. And please lord protect our officers daily from evils.

Thank you for all your team is doing to keep us safe.

Thank you San Dimas Sheriffs....

Thank you for your service, God bless you all for what you do!

Los Angeles county needs to accept, review, and process CCW permits to all citizens with “simple self defense” as enough just cause for approval.

Excellent. People don’t talk yourself out of calling police!

Stay Safe

Danielle Espinoza

View more comments

Load more

Additional Information and Links

For Emergencies dial 911

Station Main Numbers: (909) 450-2700 or (626) 332-1184 (non-emergency)

Community Relations (909) 450-2763

Reserve Coordinator (909) 971-6295

Explorer Coordinator (909) 971-6295

Volunteer Coordinator (909) 450-2763

Traffic Information (909) 450-2725

School Resource Information (909) 450-2741

Search and Rescue Information (909) 971-6295

Crime Prevention (909) 450-2763

Detective/Investigations 909 450-2718

Ride Along Information 909 450-2763

County Area Information 909 450-2722

City of San Dimas Information 909 450-2746

San Dimas Sheriff’s Station is one of seven stations within Field Operation Region III. The station encompasses approximately 276 square miles in its patrol area. In addition to serving the City of San Dimas, the station serves the unincorporated communities of Azusa, Covina, Glendora, La Verne, Claremont, Pomona, and a large portion of the Angeles National Forrest.

The population for the areas policed by San Dimas Station is approximately one hundred and five thousand (105,000), nearly sixty-nine thousand (69,000) in the unincorporated areas and more than thirty-six thousand (36,000) in the City of San Dimas.

San Dimas Sheriff’s Station is located in the eastern portion of Los Angeles County, adjacent to the cities of La Verne and Pomona. The station serves the City of San Dimas and the unincorporated communities of Covina, Azusa, Glendora, La Verne, and Claremont. The station also provides law enforcement for the Azusa Canyon and Mount Baldy areas of the Angeles National Forest (State Route 39).

In the summer of 1927, Sheriff William I. Traeger assisted in the establishment of the original San Dimas Sheriff’s Station to serve the fruit growers and poultry raisers in the eastern section of Los Angeles County. The first station consisted of a large frame house located on San Dimas Avenue near downtown.

On May 25, 1950, a new “modern” Sheriff’s station opened on the same site. On August 4, 1960, San Dimas became the 70th city to incorporate, and contracts with the Sheriff’s Department and the Los Angeles County Fire Department for law enforcement and fire services.

On September 23, 1987, the Walnut Sheriff’s Station opened in the City of Walnut (located approximately 8 miles S/W of San Dimas). The command of San Dimas Sheriff’s Station was then consolidated with that of Walnut Sheriff’s Station.

In 2006, San Dimas Sheriff’s Station opened a new station and it is currently under the command of Captain Don Slawson.

San Dimas Sheriff’s Station is noted for its outstanding Mountain Rescue Team, established in 1955, which performs technical rescues and searches in the rugged terrain of the nearby Angeles National Forest. This unit, located at 114 E. First Street, consists of highly trained and dedicated men and women volunteers and Reserve Sheriff’s Deputies. They currently respond to an average of seven rescue calls per month involving lost hiker searches and rescues of injured persons. The station is also supported by Patrol and Posse Reserve Units.

San Dimas Sheriff’s Station has a fully staffed Detective Bureau which investigates burglaries, assaults, and many other crimes. The city of San Dimas contracts for three Special Assignment Deputies who are also bicycle patrol certified. They provide specialized “problem-oriented policing,” which addresses quality of life issues within the city of San Dimas. A crime prevention officer coordinates Business and Neighborhood Watch Programs, in addition to youth and school programs.

Traffic reports can be purchased at the San Dimas Station 24 hours a day.

The traffic office can assist you with general traffic related questions. Contacting Deputy David Timberlake at (909) 450-2725.

Fees:
Traffic report – $25.00.
Citation Correction- $20
Impound Fee: City of San Dimas – $93
Impound Fee: Los Angeles County Areas – $93
Crime Reports – $25
Repossession Fee – $15
Witness Fee – $275

Annual Overnight parking permits are available from the San Dimas City Hall for residents who cannot accommodate all their registered vehicles in the available parking spaces on their property.

Temporary overnight parking permits are available for residents and guests who wish to leave vehicles parked on city streets between 2-5 a.m, can be obtained from San Dimas City Hall or automated permit machines. Automated permit machines are located outside of the San Dimas Sheriff Station at 270 S. Walnut Avenue and at Century 21 at 1100 Via Verde Av.

For more information about these permits, contact the city’s Parking Division at (909) 394-6210

The San Dimas Station offers free vacation security checks for residents.

While you’re away, a deputy or Volunteer on Patrol will check your home for broken windows, open doors, or any other suspicious activities.

For information call (909) 450-2700.

Our Explorer Program is designed for young adults from ages 15 to 21.

They attend an academy-type training program geared to law enforcement. They assist at the station and get to ride-along with deputies in the field. The program shows the young adults what the Sheriff’s Department and law enforcement is about, and the rewards of a career in this field.

If you or anyone you know are interested in becoming an explorer, contact Deputy Bernie Ojeda at (909) 971-2762.