Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Badge

Captain
Matthew S. Vander Horck

Malibu/Lost Hills Sheriff's Station

(818) 878-1808
27050 Agoura Road, Agoura, CA 91301-5336

City of Agoura Hills, City of Calabasas, City of Hidden Hills, City of Malibu, City of Westlake Village, Chatsworth Lake Manor, Malibou Lake, Topanga, West Hills

Malibu/Lost Hills Sheriff's Station

(818) 878-1808
27050 Agoura Road, Agoura, CA 91301-5336

City of Agoura Hills, City of Calabasas, City of Hidden Hills, City of Malibu, City of Westlake Village, Chatsworth Lake Manor, Malibou Lake, Topanga, West Hills

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Badge

Captain
Matthew S. Vander Horck

Information and Updates

Throwback Thursday Image

#Throwbackthursday: lasd band

#Throwbackthursday: lasd band 900 900 SIB Staff

#Throwbackthursday #LASD As early as 1939, Sheriff Biscailuz established the Sheriff’s Boys Band. Today, the band is made up of professional musicians as well as avid amateurs who travel the…

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Great day this weekend at the LACounty Fair

Great day this weekend at the LACounty Fair 1024 683 SIB Staff

#ICYMI Great day this weekend at #LACountyFair! Good food & Great people! The parade during the fair featured LASD personnel, including Sheriff Alex Villanueva, and was a very special occasion. #LASD thanks every…

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Updated Information

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Additional Information and Links

Founded in 1977, the Malibu Search & Rescue Team is an all volunteer organization comprised of Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Reserve Deputy Sheriffs, a select few Civilian Volunteer Specialists and Incident Support Personnel. Team members volunteer their time and efforts to help others and the team does not charge for rescues. The Team is a unit of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and is also a member of the prestigious California region of the Mountain Rescue Association.

JURISDICTION
187 square miles of the Santa Monica Mountains from the Los Angeles/Ventura County line to Pacific Palisades, the east face of the Santa Susana Mountains and the contract cities of Westlake Village, Agoura Hills, Malibu, Calabasas and Hidden Hills. We can also be sent anywhere in Los Angeles County to assist other LASD teams. We also respond anywhere in the state or country if requested to do so through the California Emergency Management Agency (Cal EMA).

Malibu Mountain Rescue Team, Inc. is the team’s non-profit 501(c)(3) public benefit corporation. Donations to the team help purchase critical rescue equipment. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department provides the team with our rescue vehicles, but it does not provide all of the rescue gear required. Rescue operations conducted by the Malibu Search and Rescue Team are under the guidance of the Sheriff of Los Angeles County.

La County Sheriff Reserve are utilized to supplement the LASD Sheriff Department‘s law enforcement manpower.  Like the Full-time Deputies, Reserve Deputies are professionally trained and duly sworn law enforcement personnel.  Since LASD Reserve Forces Bureau have the same powers of arrest as Full-time Deputies they are required by law to meet the same hiring, background, medical and psychological standards as Full-time Deputies.

Our Sheriff’s Explorer Program has created a volunteer partnership between youths in our community and law enforcement. The explorers, between 15 and 21 years of age, receive extensive training in an academy setting.

They then participate in community affairs and non-hazardous law enforcement activities. The explorer program is great for those youth considering a future career in law enforcement or those who just want to get involved and help out.

If you are interested in working as a Sheriff’s Explorer, please fill out the Deputy Sheriff Explorer Interest Form, or at the bottom of this page or contact Deputy Fanny Lapkin of the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station at (661) 255-1121 x5160. Those who are interested in the Sheriff’s Explorer program, but do not wish to apply for the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station, should print the Interest Form and apply to the LA County Sheriff’s station of their preference.

The Los Angeles County Disaster Communications Service (DCS) is a volunteer organization administered by the Sheriff’s Department for the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors operating as the Emergency Operations Board (EOB). The responsibility of DCS, as authorized under County Ordinance, is to provide volunteer disaster relief communication for the citizens of Los Angeles County. The DCS training and readiness program includes weekly radio drills and exercises, monthly management meetings, and actual deployments on major Departmental operations.

During disasters, such as the 1994 Northridge Earthquake and the many fires in the Malibu area since 1951, DCS-22 members have repeatedly provided auxiliary communications between government agencies. This has included communications support to Los Angeles County government and all the Cities in the area. Support has encompassed both Fire and Law Enforcement organizations as well as Federal Agencies like FEMA and the FBI. Other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO’s) are often included. For example, during the first days after the Northridge Earthquake the only link the Granada Hills Community Hospital had with the outside world and city government was through Amateur Radio, provided by DCS-22 members.

STTOP is an innovative intervention program developed by the Lost Hills/Malibu Station of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, to educate young drivers and their parents.

It is reckless behavior and other bad driving practices that STTOP hopes to correct. The program is designed to intervene when a young driver displays poor judgment or dangerous driving behavior. Aside from following up on collision reports and citations issued, STTOP encourages citizens to call in and report dangerous teen drivers.