Fact Check

“What’s being said”

“The LASD has not done anything to counter deputy cliques.”

FACTS

As the first and only sheriff to hold employees accountable for participating in these harmful groups, I implemented a policy that bans their formation and participation in activities that harm the public or their fellow employees.  After transferring dozens of employees, I completed both criminal and administrative investigations that led to the suspension or termination of twenty-six department members.

“What’s being said”

“The LASD is soft on disciplining employees.”

FACTS

To date, 68 employees have been terminated, and another 60 internal criminal investigations have resulted in 15 employees being charged by the District Attorney’s Office, based on our own investigations – accountability at its core.

“What’s being said”

“The LASD does not support diversion for inmates.”

FACTS

Before the pandemic struck in March, we took the initiative in February and started a deliberate effort to decompress the nation’s largest jail system.  Working in collaboration with all the criminal justice partners, we depopulated five thousand inmates over the span of the next three months, and in the process established a template for the entire nation to follow.

“What’s being said”

“The LASD is not diverse.”

FACTS

Sheriff Villanueva promoted the first two Latinas to the position of Assistant Sheriff and had both serving at the same time.  There are now four female division chiefs, another first, and for the first time in the history of the department, the leadership ranks are now a truly accurate reflection of the rich diversity of our community.

“What’s being said”

“Information on deputy involved shootings is not provided in a timely manner to the public.”

FACTS

All deputy-involved shootings are thoroughly debriefed and made public at the earliest possible stage of the investigation, including video and physical evidence.

“What’s being said”

“The Department has not been transparent.”

FACTS

The department’s website, lasd.org, now has all information previously hidden from the public’s view, including data on deputy-involved shootings, discipline, conditions of confinement in the jail system, and the impact of COVID-19, along with the entire organization’s rules and regulations.

“What’s being said”

“The Department is still working with ICE in the jails.”

FACTS

Chief Laura E. Lecrivain has been a member of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (Department) since 1995.  She oversees Countywide Services Division which includes the Community Partnerships, Community Colleges, Parks, and County Services Bureau.  Prior to her promotion to chief, she worked as a commander for Countywide Services Division and Custody Division. 

As a captain, Chief Lecrivain commanded the Twin Towers Correctional Facility (TTCF) where she was responsible for over 800 personnel and the care of 3,000 mentally ill inmates arrested in Los Angeles County (County).  The TTCF is the largest mental health facility in the United States and houses the County’s most severe mental health inmates.  

During her time on the Department, Chief Lecrivain had the privilege of working an array of assignments.  As a deputy, she worked Century Station patrol, detective bureau, and Operation Safe Streets (OSS).  Later, as a sergeant, Chief Lecrivain worked at the Men’s Central Jail, Compton Station, OSS, and Administrative Services Division.  Upon her promotion to lieutenant, Chief Lecrivain worked as a watch commander at Palmdale Station, and later at Compton Station.   

Chief Lecrivain is lifetime resident of Los Angeles County.  She holds a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Management, and a Masters’ Degree in Leadership from the University of Southern California.  In her spare time, Chief Lecrivain enjoys spending time with her family and Dodger baseball.  She also loves reading and enjoys running.